Friday, February 18, 2005

How Do You Decide To Press Charges Against Your Offender

Many survivors of various forms of sexual violence have to make some tough decisions.

1. How do you know if you should press charges against your offender?
2. How do you decide if you should bring a civil suit?
3. What will be the financial and emotional cost to you if you do either one?
4. What are the benefits of doing either one?

Let's talk about it.

4 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

1. I know I should. (and will.)

2. Still trying to work through whether civil, or criminal, would be better.

3. Not sure, have to figure out exactly what expenses can be reimbursed through the State's Crime Victim fund. Emotional cost? Probably difficult, but how much worse could it be from what one went through?

4. Justice, Justice, Justice.
The truth being out there----and hence following him around till the end of his days. And the satisfaction of seeing his so-called 'teachings' being put to rest.

February 18, 2005 1:38 PM  
Blogger jewishwhistleblower said...

1) Yosher Koach. You are doing the right thing.

2) Do both. If applicable file professional complaints. If his supporters/enablers harass or defame file police complaints etc. Document everything.
A paper trail is very important. It can take decades off a sexual predators carreer and make it harder for him to abuse. It also makes it easier for his next/latest victims to come forward.

3) Local activists and victim rights groups should be able to put you in touch with others that can help and make the process much smoother. You may need to contact several for everything.

4) To bring a measure of justice into this world is a very noble and brave thing. And don't worry a full midah against your abuser and their supporters awaits them in olom habah.

February 18, 2005 2:04 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thank you---

re: " Local activists and victim rights groups should be able to put you in touch with others that can help and make the process much smoother. You may need to contact several for everything."

One conundrum to this is that the crime occurred in his state, and my state does not provide support for *me*, since the crime occurred in his state. I've had much phone support through RVA in that state, but cannot access other support services in my own state. (which seems strange to me.)

February 18, 2005 2:18 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

You should ask Vicki if she knows of any resources in your state.

February 18, 2005 2:43 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home